Labour bed, Salle Bajjar District Hospial, Rukum, rural, Nepal

The Harsh Reality for the People of Rural Nepal

The featured image above is a labour bed. This is where mothers of the region give birth – if they go to the hospital at all.

At Access Health Care Nepal we believe that health care is a human right: Everyone has the right to the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health, which includes access to all medical services, sanitation, adequate food, decent housing, healthy working conditions, and a clean environment.

After seeing the current state of the Salle Bajjar District Hospital however, we had to conclude, that if one of us was a patient in this region, we would avoid all contact with its health care system if possible at all. Looking through this gallery speaks for it self. You don’t have to ask yourself whether or not you would like to be admitted here to know the answer. This is the largest public hospital in Rukum and the condition of it is devastating for the people.

After an initial meeting with the doctors of the hospital we were given a tour of the hospital. A quick inventory (made during the tour) showed that more than 66% of the equipment is out of order – and we were not counting the piles of broken equipment in the storeroom as the storekeeper was on leave.

The hospital has 15 beds and an occupancy rate at all time of at least 150% – and 200-300% is not uncommon. The hospital has no biomedical engineering staff and in consequence they have no preventive maintenance program. If something breaks, a request for new equipment is made to the government. Whether the request is met or not is completely unpredictable.

During the Maoist insurgency Doctors Without Borders were active in the region and the hospital was quite well off. However, since activity of the Maoists came to an end around 2011, the activity of Doctors Without Borders did the same, and today the hospital has become completely neglected.

At a hospital like Salle Bajjar District Hospital, the presence of Access Health Care Nepal as well as Engineering World Health would not only be helpful, but would be a part of fulfilling every individual’s fundamental human right to health care.

A central aim of for Access Health Care Nepal is to create awareness of the health care circumstances in rural Nepal. You can help us by sharing this article.

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