Tag Archives: cables

How Our Team Helped Roosevelt Hospital Achieve a 79x Value for Money in Guatemala — and More!

As described extensively on this blog, working in a developing country hospital is not always easy.

In effect, it always results in a great sensation of success, when one suddenly finds a hidden stash of valuable – yes – cables. Exactly that happened when our group found the ECG’s cables and power supplies shown in the pictures below.

In a storage room at the emergency department of the hospital we found 7 vital signs monitors, 7 Power supplies, 2 pulse-oximeters and 3 ECG cables in woking condition. Unfortunately, all remaining cables for the seven machines were broken, an example of which (an SPO2 sensor/pulse-oximeter) is shown here.

From all the parts we had an fixed we managed partially assemble 5 working Vital Signs Monitors: Two of them were put back in to service with pulse-oximetry and ECG working, 3 of them with ECG only. Unfortunately the department didn’t have any compatible blood pressure cuffs, so we would have to buy new ones, just as we wouls need additional pulseoximeters and ECG cables.

Vital signs monitors are fairly simple pieces of medical equipment, however the cheapest completely refurbished set found on eBay that is corresponding to these machines is $3.503.

Thus having these pieces in working condition would have an extremely high value to Roosevelt Hospital. Meanwhile the cheapest prices on eBay for replacement parts, that we need to put all of these vital signs monitors back into service, are found for $24 (SPO2) + $54.50 (ECG) + $12.5 (Blood pressure cuffs).

In “How to repair shielding on ECG cables and leads”  I described how we we repaired three sets of cables. The fixes were good, but not perfect in that we did make the cables work, but the signal was still somewhat noisy, for which reason the machines couldn’t have been used in surgery and detailed diagnosetics – rather they were useful for general “simple” monitoring.

Considereing the fixed cables as being in working condition (a somewhat noisy signal is, after all, better than no signal at all), we now just needed 2 ECG cables, 5 SPO2 censors and 7 blood pressure cuffs to make all of these machines work.

The total cost of this according to the prices on eBay would be just $321, although with used parts.

Considering that a completely new refurbished set on eBay costs 3.503, the value of these equipments reach $24521 in order to buy seven of these machines.

By repairing these machines our team achieved 79x value for money (even though the fix wasn’t perfect).

Now, I thought this story would end here, when, out of the blue, I received an email from Mr. Juan Fernández at Spacelabs Healthcare in Latin America,  who wrote that they would be able to send the broken parts to us —  free of charge! We could now make all the machines work perfectly (with no noise on the line). My collegue in Guatemala, biomedical engineer and expert technician Mr. Joe Leier will receive and bring this donation to Roosevelt Hospital as soon as possible.

I want to thank the people, that have been a part of saving these machines: my collegues Ms. Rebecca Avena and Mr. Joe Leir and Mr. Juan Fernandez at Spacelabs. We at EWH and Roosevelt hospital we are extremely thankful for this donation, which now means that Roosevelt hospital has 7 fully refurbished, high quality patient monitors working in their emergency department.

How to Repair Broken Shielding on ECG Cables

The work done by engineers in a developing country includes a range of smart repairs that help hospitals save significant expenses.

Equipment cables are common examples of broken parts found in developing countries. Just a week ago I described how our group found seven vital signs monitors out of use at Roosevelt National Hospital in Guatemala. This last week, our group found the cables for the monitors, however the shielding on them was broken. The picture on the left shows the cable with broken shielding, while the picture on the right depicts the noisy — and clinically useless — ECG signal.

Buying one new ECG   cable for a patient monitor would cost $51 if purchased on eBay.  However, it is feasible to fix the ECG cables and avoid the cost of purchasing new parts.  In order to do this, we performed three simple steps:

1) Wrap foil carefully around the ECG cables.

2)  Ensure that the foil is electrically connected to the ends of the original ECG cable shielding.

3)  Wrap the foil tightly in electrical tape

The photo on the right shows the resulting ECG signal. The ‘p-q-r-s-t” sequence of a normal ECG signal can be seen on the screen.

The result is still not optimal, as there is residual noise interfering with the signal. Our group is currently investigating ways to make the shielding more effective so that the foil is optimally electrically connected along the entire length of the cables.

The EWH Guatemala Winter Institute 2014/15 Roosevelt Group considering the resulting signal and if it can be further improved.
The EWH Guatemala Winter Institute 2014/15 Roosevelt Group considering the resulting signal and if it can be further improved. Left: Caty Lin – George Mason University, Middle behind: Shanyce Stewart, Rochester Institute of Technology, Middle in front: Becca Avena – Marquette University and Co-op at GE Healthcare, Right: Mohammad Ali – George Mason University.