Tag Archives: culture shock

How Broken Medical Equipment Ends Up in the Worlds Poorest Hospitals

Global Medical Aid (GMA), an aid organization from the Capitol Region of Denmark, was given broken medical equipment and therefore forced to spend their resources separating life-saving medical equipment from useless machines. Unfortunately, not all organisations perform this vital quality control: many donations end up as nothing more than piles of junk at the world’s poorest hospitals.

Medical equipment is extremely valuable and has the potential to significantly improve health care in developing countries. In an effort to aid the world’s poorest health care systems, western hospitals often donate used medical equipment when updating their inventory.

Unfortunately, donations often don’t have the intended positive impact. An example of how donations can end up causing more harm than good was featured on the main Danish news channel DR1:

Aid Organization was Given Broken Medical Equipment: We are Being Used as Landfill

The news story was on national Danish television and radio.

It is described how regional politicians of the Capitol Region of Denmark did not set aside resources for testing of equipment donations before the machines were given to Global Medical Aid (GMA). GMA had to spend a large amount of financial and human resources on separating useful pieces from broken ones —  resources that should have been spent on the transportation of equipment to developing countries. (See translation of the full story at the end of this post).

Not all aid organisations pay third parties to test the quality of their donations as GMA does. Many aid organizations simply ship malfunctioning equipment directly to developing countries without any quality assurance whatsoever.

An example of this is illustrated in the pictures below from Roosevelt Hospital in Guatemala City, taken on the the 30th of December 2014. I am currently working at the hospital with Engineering World Health as part of a six person team of students and professionals from Rochester Institute of Technology, George Mason University, Marquette University and the Technical University of Denmark. We are based at Roosevelt Hospital in Guatemala City with the aim of placing broken donated equipment back into service.

Broken equipment in the equipment "junk yard" #2
How donations can end up once they reach the target hospital: Broken equipment in the equipment “junk yard” and Hospital Roosevelt in Guatemala City. This photo was taken on the 30th of December 2014.

Already during our first day at the hospital we found vital medical equipment out of use: 14 haemodyalisis machines, 7 vital signs monitors, 4 anaesthesia machines and an incubator. The well-meaning donations are left as junk in the “equipment graveyard” in the back of the hospital.

Another example of failure to target donations properly is shown in the following picture from the same hospital, featuring the pictured dental chair, which is still partly contained in the original wrapping, indicating that the chair has most probably never been used.

This dental chair was donated to Roosevelt Hospital in Guatemala and as seen on the picture, it has never been used: Part of the original wrapping is still on there.
This dental chair was donated to Roosevelt National Hospital in Guatemala and as seen on the picture, it has never been used: Part of the original wrapping is still on the chair.

Unfortunately, the problem we are facing at Roosevelt Hospital is not unique. It is seen in developing countries around the world. Leslie Calman, CEO at Engineering World Health, summarises the issue as follows:

“The donation of medical equipment is a generous and well-meaning outpouring of aid, intended to strengthen health care systems, reduce human suffering and extend life-saving remedies to millions. But if not done with care and attendtion to local conditions — including the capacity of local hospitals to install and maintain the equipment —  the generosity may not live up to its donors’ good intentions. The Secretary General of the United Nations has stated that as much as 70% of essential medical equipment is not functioning in the developing world.  Coupled with equipment donations should be an investment in training a local workforce to maintain and service the equipment. This would create local jobs, build skills, improve the environment, and create the conditions in which healthcare can be safely delivered.”

The magnitude of harm caused by faulty equipment donations goes largely unnoticed. To illustrate this, consider the following: According to World Bank, the Danish health care expenditure in 2012 was 11.2% of Danish GDP, accumulating to $6,304 per capita (the corresponding number in the United States is 17.9%). This means that $6304 is spent on health care for every single one of Denmark’s 5.6 million citizens.

$34.65 billion is spent on health care in Denmark every year. Contrary to popular belief, this money is not spent on the high salaries of doctors. Based on the average yearly physician’s salary in Denmark of $85,000 and nurse’s salary set at $54,000, only 18% of the Danish health care expenditure is spent on salaries. The major part of the remaining $28.14 billion is spent on hospital infrastructure and the extremely valuable medical equipment.

My point is not that poor hospitals don’t need equipment donations. Rather, the important aspect to realise is that the donation of advanced technologies is extremely complicated.  Resource-poor health care systems are in need of expertise from professionals who understand advanced health care technologies and the logistical complexity behind donations.

The fact that a vast amount of broken equipment is sent off to fill up the words poorest hospitals without ever being used is ethically irresponsible and indefensible. It is essential that local health care workers, departments, and hospitals ensure that well-meaing donations actually end up fulfilling their life-saving purpose.

Translation of the original story: 

Danish hospitals donate used medical equipment to alleviate poor countries. However, aid organisation warns that the equipment may be dangerous to use.
In a corner of Global Medical Aid's storage halls in Birkerød you'll find more than 30 infusion pumps. They are donated from hospitals in the Capitol Region and should have been sent to poor countries in Africa, but as it turns out, this equipment is completely defective.
The relief organisation Global Medical Aid sends hospital equipment to poor countries around the world. They are now accusing the Capitol Region for using them as a landfill. 
The reason is that the organisation has been given an abundance of used medical equipment that does not work at all. Everything from anaesthesia machines to infusion pumps and defibrillators have turned out to be broken.
"We have obviously been treated as if we were a landfill site, where hospitals could get rid of the equipment they have been storing in basements for years" says Hans Frederik Dydensborg, the president of Global Medical Aid (GMA).The politicians of the region have now decided that medical equipment is to be donated in an ethically responsible way. According to GMA, it is directly unethical when hospitals donate equipment that doesn't work. GMA has incurred large expenses in separating working pieces from broken ones -- money that should have been spent on bringing the equipment to the world’s poorest countries."We have had large amounts of unnecessary expenses, with the consequence being that we haven't been able to send off the containers as expected" says Hans Frederik Dydensborg.In the Capitol Region, the chairman of the IT and debureaucratisation committee, who is responsible for recycling medical equipment, is concerned about the fact some donations have proven to be useless."Of course the equipment must have a certain standard, and of course it to be in a condition such that it can be used" says Lise Müller (Socialist People's Party).To avoid faulty donations in the future, the Capitol Region is now creating a storage hall in order to collect used equipment from hospitals and check it up for errors and deficiencies before they are sent on to aid organisations.In the region of Mid-Jutland, they have good experiences with a corresponding scheme."I am sure that we can find people who could find use of the equipment. If they don't, we will have to throw it out. But of course we have to learn from this, that the equipment we donate is of the right quality" says Lise Müller. The new storage halls will cost about DKK 2 million (USD 330.000) a year to maintain and the money will be found in the 2016 budget of the capitol region.

The Greatest Sunset Ever…

As the sun set it lit up the skies from below and turned everything red. We put on music and we were having a great time with the whole staff,  listening to Dimmi, Promesses (the Obama song) – the speach that says:

“it doesn’t matter who you are, where you come from, what you look like or where you love…”

One of the guys told me he gets the chills everytime we listen to it. We agreed that we would listen to it every evening on the rest of the trek. 

The guys on the pictures include Agapit, Rashiti, Kalisti, Thomas, Calvin, Gofrey, Hilary.  

Educating, teaching and building parts

Some pictures from a great day in Moshi: We fixed an infant warmer, taught nurses how to use the manual suction pump and made new parts for infant incubator with assistance from the orthopedics/prothsis department.

1: KJ is teaching a nurse at the female medical ward how to use the manual suction pump – which was suprisingly challenging, not just for the locals, but also for us (had to read the manual…)

2: Samson from the orthopaedic department at KCMC is preparing a new piece for an infant incubator that we have been working on.

3: The KCMC has a whole department for creating prothesis – the department is actually a Danida donation from the 70, where approx. 70 danes came to Moshi to do development work.

4: We were (here KJ) teaching one nurse from each department of Mawenzi how to use the manual suctionpumpt. The main points are to put water around the lid to close it tightly and fold the tube for vacuum.

5: Nurse is bringing back the suction pump to the department – now working – this pump is useful whenever there’s a powercut or when the electrical ones breake (which happens quite often..)

6: This guy spent approx. 1.5 hrs showing me around Moshi as we were lookig for a diode that we needed to fix an infant incubator. People in Moshi are reallyreallyreally helpful

Arriving in Nepal

Finally I’ve arrived in Nepal, right now writing from Hotel Excelsior in Thamel, the tourist centre of Kathmandu.
I was picked up at the airport by Nepali projects abroad staff and brought to the hotel where care & teaching coordinator Waise gave us (2 fellow volunteers and myself) a thorough induction about probably everything we need to know, among them some cultural differences, some of which are quite interesting, say even shocking; in Nepal it’s okay to kick away dogs (though this makes some sense knowing that many of them carry diseases), its normal to see a woman carrying a heavy jar on her head with her husband walking behind her doing nothing, and the use of violence to discipline your children is quite normal (not to say that everyone does this – I wouldn’t know).
After the induction we went out to see the “Monkey Temple” – with the amazing experience of the way taxies drive hastily through the small crowded streets.

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There you go – some monkey tower pictures (more to come). Tomorrow I’m off to Chitwan, currently looking very much forward to meeting the family I’m going to live with.