Tag Archives: occupancy rate

Mount Meru Hospital, Tanzania

Each Friday for the next three weeks, the Tanzania EWH team will  work at Mount Meru Hospital just outside the heart of Arusha.

The Tanzanian health care system consists of larger referral/consultant hospitals such as Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center, regional referral centers covering several districts, and smaller hospitals covering one district each such as Karatu Hospital.

Mount Meru is a regional hospital with departments for obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, surgery, out-patients, and units for ophthalmology and dentistry. The hospital also has a laboratory and an intensive care unit. The hospital typically sees 500 patients per day on an outpatient basis and admits approximately 250-290 patients every day.

Generally there is a fee to be seen by a doctor at Mount Meru; however, as a public hospital, they are obliged to serve all people, and will provide free health care to those who cannot afford  it.

The typical population served by the hospital consists of farmers, pastoralists or industry workers. These are families that earn a low to middle-class income. Some of those who work in the outskirts of the districts covered by Mount Meru Hospital (for example people coming from Ngorongoro or Longido district) have nine hours travelling time to the hospital. Others simply can’t afford the cost of transportation. As a result, acute patients, especially pregnant women and children, often reach the hospital too late for doctors to do anything.

According to hospital staff, the largest barriers to provide health care services in Tanzania are lack of capacity to handle all, but especially acute patients, lack of funding and lack of accessibility to medicines, supplies and health care technologies. These issues are more or less apparent in all across governmental Tanzanian hospitals from the district level up to referral/consultant levels. Handling acute cases is a particularly large problem at district hospitals, which is why regional hospitals like Mount Meru experience a very high occupancy rate and a high number of patients, that do not reach the hospital in time for an ideal outcome of their treatment.

At Mount Meru Hospital, one challenge in meeting the demand is the large amount of donated equipment of which only about half is currently functioning. The entire region has just one biomedical engineering technician (BMET), Mr. Sharif Rajabu Kishakali. As of early 2015, he is the first ever BMET at Mt. Meru Hospital. He is currently working on a preventative maintenance program for the hospital’s equipment. The attached pictures are a collection from the projects he is currently working on.

The Harsh Reality for the People of Rural Nepal

The featured image above is a labour bed. This is where mothers of the region give birth – if they go to the hospital at all.

At Access Health Care Nepal we believe that health care is a human right: Everyone has the right to the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health, which includes access to all medical services, sanitation, adequate food, decent housing, healthy working conditions, and a clean environment.

After seeing the current state of the Salle Bajjar District Hospital however, we had to conclude, that if one of us was a patient in this region, we would avoid all contact with its health care system if possible at all. Looking through this gallery speaks for it self. You don’t have to ask yourself whether or not you would like to be admitted here to know the answer. This is the largest public hospital in Rukum and the condition of it is devastating for the people.

After an initial meeting with the doctors of the hospital we were given a tour of the hospital. A quick inventory (made during the tour) showed that more than 66% of the equipment is out of order – and we were not counting the piles of broken equipment in the storeroom as the storekeeper was on leave.

The hospital has 15 beds and an occupancy rate at all time of at least 150% – and 200-300% is not uncommon. The hospital has no biomedical engineering staff and in consequence they have no preventive maintenance program. If something breaks, a request for new equipment is made to the government. Whether the request is met or not is completely unpredictable.

During the Maoist insurgency Doctors Without Borders were active in the region and the hospital was quite well off. However, since activity of the Maoists came to an end around 2011, the activity of Doctors Without Borders did the same, and today the hospital has become completely neglected.

At a hospital like Salle Bajjar District Hospital, the presence of Access Health Care Nepal as well as Engineering World Health would not only be helpful, but would be a part of fulfilling every individual’s fundamental human right to health care.

A central aim of for Access Health Care Nepal is to create awareness of the health care circumstances in rural Nepal. You can help us by sharing this article.