Tag Archives: repair

How Our Team Helped Roosevelt Hospital Achieve a 79x Value for Money in Guatemala — and More!

As described extensively on this blog, working in a developing country hospital is not always easy.

In effect, it always results in a great sensation of success, when one suddenly finds a hidden stash of valuable – yes – cables. Exactly that happened when our group found the ECG’s cables and power supplies shown in the pictures below.

In a storage room at the emergency department of the hospital we found 7 vital signs monitors, 7 Power supplies, 2 pulse-oximeters and 3 ECG cables in woking condition. Unfortunately, all remaining cables for the seven machines were broken, an example of which (an SPO2 sensor/pulse-oximeter) is shown here.

From all the parts we had an fixed we managed partially assemble 5 working Vital Signs Monitors: Two of them were put back in to service with pulse-oximetry and ECG working, 3 of them with ECG only. Unfortunately the department didn’t have any compatible blood pressure cuffs, so we would have to buy new ones, just as we wouls need additional pulseoximeters and ECG cables.

Vital signs monitors are fairly simple pieces of medical equipment, however the cheapest completely refurbished set found on eBay that is corresponding to these machines is $3.503.

Thus having these pieces in working condition would have an extremely high value to Roosevelt Hospital. Meanwhile the cheapest prices on eBay for replacement parts, that we need to put all of these vital signs monitors back into service, are found for $24 (SPO2) + $54.50 (ECG) + $12.5 (Blood pressure cuffs).

In “How to repair shielding on ECG cables and leads”  I described how we we repaired three sets of cables. The fixes were good, but not perfect in that we did make the cables work, but the signal was still somewhat noisy, for which reason the machines couldn’t have been used in surgery and detailed diagnosetics – rather they were useful for general “simple” monitoring.

Considereing the fixed cables as being in working condition (a somewhat noisy signal is, after all, better than no signal at all), we now just needed 2 ECG cables, 5 SPO2 censors and 7 blood pressure cuffs to make all of these machines work.

The total cost of this according to the prices on eBay would be just $321, although with used parts.

Considering that a completely new refurbished set on eBay costs 3.503, the value of these equipments reach $24521 in order to buy seven of these machines.

By repairing these machines our team achieved 79x value for money (even though the fix wasn’t perfect).

Now, I thought this story would end here, when, out of the blue, I received an email from Mr. Juan Fernández at Spacelabs Healthcare in Latin America,  who wrote that they would be able to send the broken parts to us —  free of charge! We could now make all the machines work perfectly (with no noise on the line). My collegue in Guatemala, biomedical engineer and expert technician Mr. Joe Leier will receive and bring this donation to Roosevelt Hospital as soon as possible.

I want to thank the people, that have been a part of saving these machines: my collegues Ms. Rebecca Avena and Mr. Joe Leir and Mr. Juan Fernandez at Spacelabs. We at EWH and Roosevelt hospital we are extremely thankful for this donation, which now means that Roosevelt hospital has 7 fully refurbished, high quality patient monitors working in their emergency department.

Fixes in Moshi, KCMC and Mawenzi

ewhdtu:

The last couple of weeks have been stuffed with interesting fixes and great experiences in Moshi, KCMC and Mawenzi, Here are some of my favourite photos.

Educating, teaching and building parts

Some pictures from a great day in Moshi: We fixed an infant warmer, taught nurses how to use the manual suction pump and made new parts for infant incubator with assistance from the orthopedics/prothsis department.

1: KJ is teaching a nurse at the female medical ward how to use the manual suction pump – which was suprisingly challenging, not just for the locals, but also for us (had to read the manual…)

2: Samson from the orthopaedic department at KCMC is preparing a new piece for an infant incubator that we have been working on.

3: The KCMC has a whole department for creating prothesis – the department is actually a Danida donation from the 70, where approx. 70 danes came to Moshi to do development work.

4: We were (here KJ) teaching one nurse from each department of Mawenzi how to use the manual suctionpumpt. The main points are to put water around the lid to close it tightly and fold the tube for vacuum.

5: Nurse is bringing back the suction pump to the department – now working – this pump is useful whenever there’s a powercut or when the electrical ones breake (which happens quite often..)

6: This guy spent approx. 1.5 hrs showing me around Moshi as we were lookig for a diode that we needed to fix an infant incubator. People in Moshi are reallyreallyreally helpful