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Fixes in Moshi, KCMC and Mawenzi

ewhdtu:

The last couple of weeks have been stuffed with interesting fixes and great experiences in Moshi, KCMC and Mawenzi, Here are some of my favourite photos.

Charging batteries

Goodmorning-battery charge for a paediatric pulse-oximeter:

9 volts / 250 ohm resistor , charging with approximately 40-50 miliamps, yielding charging rate of about 1/20.

Educating, teaching and building parts

Some pictures from a great day in Moshi: We fixed an infant warmer, taught nurses how to use the manual suction pump and made new parts for infant incubator with assistance from the orthopedics/prothsis department.

1: KJ is teaching a nurse at the female medical ward how to use the manual suction pump – which was suprisingly challenging, not just for the locals, but also for us (had to read the manual…)

2: Samson from the orthopaedic department at KCMC is preparing a new piece for an infant incubator that we have been working on.

3: The KCMC has a whole department for creating prothesis – the department is actually a Danida donation from the 70, where approx. 70 danes came to Moshi to do development work.

4: We were (here KJ) teaching one nurse from each department of Mawenzi how to use the manual suctionpumpt. The main points are to put water around the lid to close it tightly and fold the tube for vacuum.

5: Nurse is bringing back the suction pump to the department – now working – this pump is useful whenever there’s a powercut or when the electrical ones breake (which happens quite often..)

6: This guy spent approx. 1.5 hrs showing me around Moshi as we were lookig for a diode that we needed to fix an infant incubator. People in Moshi are reallyreallyreally helpful

Working at Mount Meru Hospital

davidkvcs:

Our (Ashley Reid, KJ Stime and me) first fix: an oxygen concentrator with a broken aluminum tube. We initially tried to reinsert the non-broken part of the aluminum tube into the compressor outlet, however this caused a major leak.
We ended up connecting the two ends with rubber tubes. The entire composition was held together by plastic zip-ties.
The oxygen concentration is now once again ready for use – an easy but useful fix.